Two black friends working out together, discussing how to avoid pain before workouts.

How to Avoid Pain Before Workouts

If you’ve ever worked out before, or even just done something physically strenuous, then you know that sometimes the next day your body feels worse for wear. It hurts to move, your muscles ache, and, sometimes, there is pain that might be a bit more serious. It could be you went a little too hard on the run or on the weights you were using, and the pain follows you around for weeks after.

There are habits you should be before, during, and after working out that will keep the pain away so you can stay on top of your game. To learn how to avoid pan before workouts from the experts at Alliance Spine and Pain, keep reading below.

What to do Before and During Workouts

  • Warm up. Make sure to properly warm up. Do some small movements, like spinning your arms in circles, or walk for a few minutes before beginning your exercise. Depending on what you’re doing for the day, there are certain static and dynamic warm ups you need to perform. Do some research to figure out your best warm up plan.
  • Stretch. In the same vein of thought, whatever muscles you use should be stretched out properly before you begin to work them. Take the time to do your favorite stretches before you hop on your equipment.
  • Hydrate. If you stay properly hydrated, you can successfully prevent cramping and inflammation of your muscles, which prevents muscle soreness.
  • Research the correct form. If you’re going to be doing some difficult weight lifting or long physical activity, make sure you do plenty of research beforehand on the correct form. It can make a world of a difference to your muscles and prevention of injury if you use the correct form while running or while deadlifting.

What to do After Workouts

  • Cool down. Just like it’s vital to warm up before exercising, it’s also super important to cool down. After you’ve finished lifting weights or running, consider walking for a few minutes or cycling to let your muscles relax.
  • Roll it out. Using foam rollers to roll out your muscles reduces soreness and also help strengthen your body for future workouts by relieving the tension in your muscle’s connective tissue. All you need to do is spend about 10 to 15 minutes after your workout using the tool, and you’ll be good to go.
  • Give yourself a massage. If you don’t have a foam roller, you can always self massage to help loosen the tension and get your muscles feeling back to their normal selves.
  • Apply heat or cold directly to the source. If you’re experiencing severe pain from sore muscles, grab a heat pack or some ice to apply directly to your muscles. This will help alleviate the pain quickly.
  • Ice bath. Not afraid of cold water and really afraid of sore muscles? Jump in an ice bath. It’ll be a pain to create in your own home and it probably won’t be much fun, but it will give your muscles a fighting chance to not be sore after a grueling workout.
  • Warm bath. If the idea of an ice bath sounds horrible and you already have sore muscles, go for the opposite and climb into a nice warm bath. The steaming water will relax your tight muscles and also help to promote blood flow.
  • Eat some pineapple or cherries. This one may sound a bit weird, but it’s been scientifically proven that the chemical makeup of pineapple and cherries can reduce inflammation and prevent sore muscles. So, if your sore muscles are killing you, always keep some of these fruit around.

If you regularly experience severe pain after working out, click here to contact the expert pain management specialists at Alliance Spine and Pain. We can assist in ensuring that your workouts are as good for your pain as they are for your body and continue to teach you how to avoid pain before workouts.

A child and mother packing her backpack, thinking about Backpacks Affect Your Children’s Spine Health.

How Backpacks Affect Your Children’s Spine Health

If your children are heading back to school this season, then chances are they have a backpack to use throughout the year. While these bags are essential for most students, the way your children use them could be harmful for their physical health.

Keep reading below to learn from the experts at Alliance Spine and Pain about how backpacks affect your children’s spine health.

What Backpacks Can Do your Children’s Spines

If your kids are shouldering a lot of weight from their backpacks, here are the potential effects it can have on their backs and spines:

  • Lower back pain
  • Muscle strain
  • Irritation on the spine joints and rib cage
  • Distortion of the curves in the middle and lower spine
  • Poor posture
  • Loss of balance
  • Increase in falls
  • Muscle spasms

Overall, improper use of backpacks today can lead to long-term negative effects in the future. To prevent that from happening to your children, use these guidelines for backpacks.

Things to Consider When Using a Backpack

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that a child’s backpack weigh no more than 10 to 20 percent of a child’s weight, but encourage keeping it closer to 10 percent.
  • Encourage your children to wear both straps at all times.
  • Adjust the straps on their backpacks so that it sits high on their backs. Also, make sure the straps are comfortable on their shoulders.
  • Their book bag should not extend past their waist. It should be an inch or more above their hips.
  • Their backpacks should not sway side to side when they walk.
  • Ask your kids to use the chest strap or waist strap if their packs have one.
  • If your children have to carry a lot in their bags, get them to to lighten the load by carrying their items in their arms.
  • The best kind of bags are rolling backpacks. These options don’t have the negative side-effects listed above.

If you have any more questions about how backpacks affect your children’s spine health, contact Alliance and Spine Health to speak with our specialists.

Alliance Spine and Pain Centers Welcomes Dr. Efosia Ogiamien

Alliance Spine and Pain Centers Welcomes Dr. Efosa O. Ogiamien

Dr. Efosa O. Ogiamien graduated University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. He completed his residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL. Then, he became fellowship-trained in interventional pain from University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL. Dr. Ogiamien is a member of many professional anesthesiology societies including American Society of Anesthesiologists, North American Neuromodulation Society, and American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine. He will be serving Alliance Spine and Pain’s locations in Camp Creek, Conyers, Dawsonville, and Roswell starting in August.

Please contact a Referral Coordinator at 770.929.9033 to schedule your new patient appointment today.

Alliance Spine and Pain Centers Welcomes Dr. Omar Hajmurad

Alliance Spine and Pain Centers Welcomes Dr. Omar S. Hajmurad

Dr. Omar Hajmurad graduated from Mercer University School of Medicine. He completed his residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL. Then, he became fellowship-trained in the division of interventional pain from the Department of Anesthesiology at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. Dr. Hajmurad is board certified in anesthesiology and will be serving Alliance Spine and Pain’s locations in Austell and Carrollton starting in August. In his spare time, he enjoys playing tennis, golf, football, and basketball.

Please contact a Referral Coordinator at 770.929.9033 to schedule your new patient appointment today.

Children holding hands and running down aisle of a school, getting back to school prep help.

Back to School Prep Help from the Experts at Alliance Spine and Pain

Getting kids ready to start the school year involves more than buying school supplies and shopping for new clothes. There are many things you can do to help ensure your kids are prepared for a healthy and productive school year. 

The following three tips are a great start for back to school prep help.

Get vaccinated

You, your partner, and your children should all get vaccinated as early as possible in the school year.  Talk to your children’s health care provider and your doctor to find out which ones are recommended. Consider getting the flu vaccine, too. 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends an annual flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older.

Teach good hygiene habits

Kids don’t always listen when parents tell them to wash their hands before eating, after using the bathroom, or when they come inside from playing. But it’s a message worth repeating — hand washing is by far the best way to prevent germs from spreading and to keep kids from getting sick and from bringing germs home. 

You should also instruct them not to share food or drinks with other kids, as this is another easy way germs are transferred.

Set bedtimes

It’s essential for kids (and adults!) to get a healthy amount of sleep each night to stay focused throughout the day. Although sleep requirements vary somewhat among individuals, most adults need about eight hours of sleep each night, and children and adolescents typically need more than eight hours. 

To get your kids ready to wake up earlier for school, consider making their bedtimes a little earlier each night for a week or two before school starts. Sticking to a routine is important too, so try to not let weekends become late-night free-for-alls.

Following these easy tips along with other common sense approaches will help your children enjoy a safe and healthy school year. If you have any questions about pain management for your children and this school year or other back to school prep help, click here to schedule an appointment with the experts at Alliance Spine and Pain

Alliance Spine Welcomes Dr. Narayan

Please Join Alliance Spine and Pain Centers in Welcoming Dr. Preeti Narayan

Dr. Preeti Narayan graduated from Grant Medical College in Mumbai, India. She completed her residency and internship at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY. She became fellowship-trained in chronic interventional pain management at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, IL and in acute pain and regional anesthesiology at Emory University in Atlanta, GA.

Dr. Narayan is board-certified in anesthesiology. She is a member of many professional anesthesiology societies including American Society of Anesthesiologists, Georgia Society of Anesthesiologists, North American Neuromodulation Society, American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, and American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians.

Dr. Narayan will be serving Alliance Spine and Pain’s locations in Brookhaven, Covington, and Piedmont starting in August. Please contact a Referral Coordinator at 770.929.9033 to schedule your new patient appointment today.